12 ss Command Examples to Monitor Network Connections

ss command is a tool that is used for displaying network socket related information on a Linux system. The tool displays more detailed information that the netstat command which is used for displaying active...

from Tecmint: Linux Howtos, Tutorials & Guides https://www.tecmint.com/ss-command-examples-in-linux/…

11 Awesome Things You Laptop Can Do

Have you explored your laptop? By that, I mean, thoroughly explore it to know the other things that it can do for you? If the answer is no, you’re in for a big surprise because your laptop can do so many other things.

Take a trip off the beaten track to some of the lesser-known features and options available to you—from expanding your screen space, to improving system security.

(Via: https://gizmodo.com/11-things-your-laptop-can-do-that-you-might-not-know-ab-1835899474)

Let’s start. Did you know that your laptop can go dark? Yes, it can. Here’s how.

Dark mode is everywhere these days, pretty much, and Windows and macOS have joined in. Automatic dark-mode-on-a-schedule is arriving later this year in macOS Catalina, but on macOS Mojave you can enable it manually by opening System Preferences from the Apple menu, then choosing General and Dark.

Windows user? Click the settings cog on the Start menu, then select Personalization, Colors, and Dark (under the Choose your default app mode heading). These changes should affect both the operating system and the various apps running on top of it, at least in most cases.

(Via: https://gizmodo.com/11-things-your-laptop-can-do-that-you-might-not-know-ab-1835899474)

For the gamers out there, I’m sure you already that it’s possible to stream games from your console to your laptop. The things is, your parents might not know about it. So, this is an FYI for parents out there who think their kids are always studying on their laptop.

Laptops have been able to stream games from a PS4 or Xbox One on the same wifi network for a long time (way before Google Stadia arrived).

(Via: https://gizmodo.com/11-things-your-laptop-can-do-that-you-might-not-know-ab-1835899474)

Another awesome thing your laptop can do is that it can pin websites to the dock or taskbar.

As well as pinning apps to the dock or taskbar (delete as appropriate), you can also pin websites that you frequently visit for speedy access—a sort of upgrade to the bookmarking system already available in your browser.

Mac users can just drag down a URL from the address bar in Safari to the far right-hand side of the dock. If you’re on Windows, it’s most easily done from Microsoft Edge: Open the program’s menu then choose Pin this

Become A Linux Foundation Certified Sysadmin [65% Off]

The Linux Foundation is offering beginner sysadmin and advanced sysadmin training and certification bundle at more than 65% off. You have better career prospect as a certified Linux professional.

from It’s FOSS https://itsfoss.com/linux-foundation-certified-sysadmin/…

CentOS Linux 7.7 released and here is how to update it

The CentOS Linux project has released an updated version of its stable Linux distribution CentOS Linux 7.7. You must upgrade to get corrections for security problem as this version made a few adjustments for the severe issue found in CentOS 7.6. CentOS is a Linux distro that is mainly maintained and updated through the work of many users who volunteer their time and effort. It is based upon RHEL 7.7 upstream source code.
The post CentOS Linux 7.7 released and here is how to update it appeared first on nixCraft.

from [RSS/Feed] nixCraft: Linux Tips, Hacks, Tutorials, And Ideas In Blog Format https://www.cyberciti.biz/linux-news/centos-linux-7-released-and-here-is-how-to-update-it/…

How to Recover Deleted Files Using TestDisk in Linux

We all know the feeling of looking for a file and not finding it, even in the trash. The trauma that comes with file and data loss should end thanks to the TestDisk –...

from Tecmint: Linux Howtos, Tutorials & Guides https://www.tecmint.com/recover-deleted-files-using-testdisk-in-linux/…

Wow: NVMe and PCIe Gen 4

Recently it’d come to my attention that my old PC rig wasn’t cutting it.

Considering it was 10 years old, it was doing really well. I mean, I went from HDD to 500 GB SSD to 1 TB SSD, up’d the RAM, and replaced the GPU at least once. But still, it was a 4-core system (8 threads) and it had performed admirably.

The Intel NIC was needed because the built-in ASUS Realtek NIC was a piece of crap, only able to push about 90 MB/s. The Intel NIC was able to push 120 MB/s (close to the theoretical max for 1 Gigabit which is 125 MB/s).

The thing that broke the camel’s back, however, was video. Specifically 4K video. I’ve been doing video edits and so forth in 1080p, but moving to 4K and the power of Premerier Pro (as opposed to iMovie) was just killing my system. 1080p was a challenge, and 4K made it keel over.

I tend to get obsessive about new tech purchases. My first flat screen TV purchase in 2006 was the result of about a month of in-depth research. I pour over specs and reviews for everything from parachutes (btw, did you know I’m a skydiver?) to RAM.

Eventually, here’s the system I settled on:

AMD came out of nowhere and launched Ryzen 3, which put ADM from a budget-has-been to a major contender in the desktop world. Plus, they were the first to come out with PCIe Gen 4.0, which allowed for each lane of PCIe to give you 2 GB/s of bandwidth. m.2 drives can connect to 4 lanes, giving a possible throughput of 8 …

RHEL 8 update installed packages for security

I would like to update installed packages for security on RHEL 8.x (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) server. How can I update my RHEL 8.x system using yum command?
The post RHEL 8 update installed packages for security appeared first on nixCraft.

from [RSS/Feed] nixCraft: Linux Tips, Hacks, Tutorials, And Ideas In Blog Format https://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/rhel-8-update-installed-packages-for-security/…